Last edited by Tak
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of Laminated root rot of western conifers found in the catalog.

Laminated root rot of western conifers

E. E. Nelson

Laminated root rot of western conifers

by E. E. Nelson

  • 155 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service in [Washington, D.C.?] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Root rots.,
  • Conifers -- Diseases and pests -- Northwest, Pacific.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementE.E. Nelson, N.E. Martin, and R.E. Williams.
    SeriesForest insect & disease leaflet -- 159.
    ContributionsMartin, N. E., Williams, R. E., United States. Forest Service.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination6 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15255008M

      Do not plant conifers of high or intermediate susceptibility in areas where laminated root rot is known to be present. Douglas-fir, white fir, grand fir, and mountain hemlock are highly susceptible; western hemlock, western larch, Pacific silver fir, subalpine fir, noble fir, California red fir and spruces are considered intermediately susceptible. Laminated root rot creates short-term snags of any size and all sizes of down wood, both in the form of whole green trees and snags that it previously killed while they were standing, by killing and decaying the root system and butts of host trees.

    Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): (external link) http Author: E. E. Nelson. Inonotus weirii (Murrill) Kotl. Phellinus weirii is a plant pathogen causing laminated root rot in certain conifers, typically Douglas-fir and western redcedar. It is widespread in the Douglas-fir growing regions of British Columbia, Washington and : Hymenochaetaceae.

    The population structure and ecological roles of the indigenous pathogen, cause of laminated root rot in conifer forests of western North America, are examined. This pathogen kills trees in slowly expanding mortality centers, creating gaps in the forest canopy. It is widespread, locally abundant, and very long-lived. It is among the most important disturbance agents in the long Cited by: COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle .


Share this book
You might also like
Kennewick Pasco Richland

Kennewick Pasco Richland

Catalogue of the renowned collection of western manuscripts

Catalogue of the renowned collection of western manuscripts

Test method for measuring energy consumption and capacity of automatic household clothes washers.

Test method for measuring energy consumption and capacity of automatic household clothes washers.

The Space Telescope

The Space Telescope

General guide to the American Museum of Natural History.

General guide to the American Museum of Natural History.

effects of pedestrian crossing facilities on delays in linked signal systems.

effects of pedestrian crossing facilities on delays in linked signal systems.

Poor Mans James Bond 2

Poor Mans James Bond 2

experiment in the teaching of biology to slow learners in high school

experiment in the teaching of biology to slow learners in high school

The thoughts of Marcus Aurelius

The thoughts of Marcus Aurelius

Centennial

Centennial

From start to finish

From start to finish

Storm drift

Storm drift

Laminated root rot of western conifers by E. E. Nelson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Nelson, E.E. Laminated root rot of western conifers. [Washington, D.C.?]: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Created Date: 4/18/ PM.

Laminated root rot can cause undesired reductions in stand densities by causing high levels of mortality, and may limit the species of trees that can be grown to a large size on a site.

It causes significant losses in growth. Susceptibility of western conifers to laminated root rot E.E. Nelson and R. Sturrock USDA Forest Service, Corvallis, Oregon, U.S.A.

and CanadianForest Service, Victoria, B.C., Canada JULY Laminated root rot caused by the fungus Phellinus weirii is one ofthe most important root diseases of conifers in western North America.

\Nood volume. Distribution of Laminated Root Rot in western North America Root diseases among the greatest mortality risks to forests in the U.S., predicted to cause more than 1 billion ft 2File Size: 8MB.

Laminated root rot (LRR) is the most damaging disease of young-growth Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in the Pacific Northwest. Laminated root rot is caused by the fungus, Phellinus weirii (Murr.) Gilb., which survives for 50 years or more in roots after infected Douglas-fir are harvested.

Successive stands. Microscopic brown fungal hairs called setal hyphae, which are diagnostic for this fungus, often cover the laminated rot. Flattened conks develop on the undersides of roots or logs.

Cultural control. Avoid building near centers of root-rot infection. Construction activity usually worsens the situation and can lead to tree failures and property loss. Laminated root rot is a typical root and butt rot. It leads to expanding centers of mortality.

Small trees die standing, and bigger ones fall over. It is restricted in distribution to the Pacific Northwest and Inland Empire area, but it occurs on a variety of important conifers there and causes very significant losses (60 million cu. causes laminated root and butt rot and is an important white rot disease of many western conifers.

In higher elevations, it is most commonly associated with mountain hemlock. Western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) and subalpine fir are often infected but rarely killed, while the pines are infected only : Jessie A.

Glaeser, Kevin T. Smith. Annosus Root Disease of Western Conifers (PDF) – USDA Forest Service Forest Insect and Diseases Leaflet FIDL Armillaria Root Rot (PDF) – USDA Forest Service Disease Management Notes Assessing Tree Health (PDF) – WSU Extension Fact Sheet FSE.

Laminated Root Rot Laminated root rot, caused by the fungus Phellinus (Poria) weirii is responsible for an annual estimated volume loss of 32 million cubic feet in the West Side Douglas-fir type. Surveys indicate approximately 5% of the area of highly susceptible host types in Oregon and Washington is out of production because of this Size: 69KB.

Root Decays; Annosum Root Rot, Armillaria Root Disease, Laminated Root Rot, Red Brown Butt Rot, Tomentosus Root Rot, Brown Root Rot, Other Root Rot Fungi; Stem and Branch Diseases; Bluestain and Bark Beetles, Pine Wilt Nematode. Laminated root rot, caused by Phellinus weirii (Murr.) Gilb., is a serious root disease affecting Douglas-fir and other commercially important species of conifers in northwestern North America.

This report gives an overview of the dis-ease as it occurs in the Pacific Northwest in Canada and the United by: Laminated root rot is one of the most damaging root disease amongst conifers in northwestern America and true firs, Douglas-fir, Mountain hemlock, and Western hemlock are highly susceptible to infection with P.

: Hymenochaetaceae. Laminated root rot should be considered a “disease of the site”. That is, established mycelia of this fungus are essentially permanent, so the best course is to minimize losses by managing tree species that can be.

expected to have better survival on infested sites. Laminated root rot is estimated to infest at leastacres inFile Size: KB. root disease is to maintain a diversity of native tree species and ages in the landscape.

References Cited: Field guide to the Common Diseases and Insect pests of Oregon and Washington Conifers, USDA Forest Service - Laminated Root Rot in Western N America, USDA Forest Service - Common Fungi Affecting Pacific Northwest Trees, 8 Dunster.

Laminated root rot. Laminated root rot is the most damaging root disease in Oregon from the stand-point of wood fiber produc-tion. Found in western and eastern Oregon, the disease is caused by the fungus Phellinus weirii. It affects all conifer species to some degree but is most damaging to Douglas-fir, grand and white fir, and mountainFile Size: 1MB.

Damage: Laminated root rot poses a major threat to its most economically important host, second-growth Douglas-fir. The disease causes root decay, which can cause significant growth reduction, and makes trees susceptible to blowdown and stem breakage (the latter is.

There are two forms of the pathogen, which are referred as Phellinus weirii sensu lato. Recently, the Douglas-fir form, that causes laminated root rot in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and other conifers in North America, has been recognized as Phellinus sulphurascens Pilát, a fungus described originally from Siberia.

Laminated root rot in western red cedar. Decayed roots separate at the annual rings like pages in a book; Laminated root rot is one of the most damaging root disease amongst conifers in northwestern America and true firs, Douglas-fir, Mountain hemlock, and Western hemlock are highly susceptible to infection with P.

Publication from the USDA Forest Service Southern. Pathogen mycelium often covers infected roots. Decayed roots separate at the annual rings like pages in a book; hence the common name laminated root rot.

Microscopic brown fungal hairs called setal hyphae, which are diagnostic for this fungus, often cover the laminated rot. Flattened conks develop on the undersides of roots or logs.Several species of conifers were outplanted around infected stumps in Oregon and British Columbia to measure their susceptibility to laminated root rot caused by Phellinus weirii.

Grand fir (Abies grandis) experienced nearly 30% mortality caused by P. weirii. Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) mortality exceeded 20%. Noble fir (A. procera), Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis), Cited by: E. E. Nelson has written: 'Laminated root rot damage in a young Douglas-fir stand' -- subject(s): Root rots, Douglas fir, Diseases and pests 'Laminated root rot of western conifers' -- .